Hip Revision

Physical therapist helps patient use resistance band

Overview

What is a Hip Revision?

Hip revision surgery removes an old hip replacement and replaces it with a new one. Hip revision surgery may be necessary because hip replacements don’t last forever. Components can become damaged, dislocated, wear out, or loosen over time. The area around the original hip replacement may become infected or the patient may sustain another bone fracture around the current hip replacement.    

In most cases, a hip revision procedure is more complex than the initial replacement surgery because the original implant must be removed and replaced with new components. Hip revision is more difficult when there is a lack of adequate bone, an infection, or difficulty separating the implants from the bone.  

spine specialist working with a patient

Symptoms 

Hip Revision Symptoms 

There are several indications that you may need a hip revision. These include:  

  • A stiff or swollen hip 
  • Hip aches during and after activity 
  • Difficulty sleeping due to the pain 
  • A feeling of “grating” of your joint 
  • Difficulty walking or climbing stairs 
  • Rainy weather causes aches and pains 
  • You’ve had a previous injury to your hip 
  • Difficulty getting in and out of chairs and bathtubs 
  • Morning stiffness that typically lasts less than 30 minutes  
  • Using medication, a cane, or walker are no longer sufficient 
  • The hip gets stiff when sitting for a prolonged period of time 
  • Persistent or recurring pain in the hip area and loss of mobility 

Diagnosis 

Hip Revision Diagnosis 

The doctor may determine if it is time for a hip revision based on your symptoms. The doctor will perform a thorough examination of your hip, testing for strength and range of motion. X-rays will confirm if you need a hip revision due to changes in size, shape, or any unusual circumstances. An MRI or bone scan may be used to detect early stages of disease.  

Spine specialist at his computer

Treatments

Treatments for Hip Revision 

Hip revision surgery requires extensive planning. Surgical plans range from simple and straightforward to complex depending on how much damage has occurred, the integrity of previous components, and consideration of infection. Hip revision surgery also has a higher risk of complications and prolonged recovery. Your surgeon will be able to discuss all of these matters prior to surgery.  

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Recovery from hip revision surgery is more involved than recovery from a primary hip replacement. As a result, you will stay in the hospital for 2 to 4 days after the surgery. Pain medications, blood thinners, and antibiotics may be necessary. Most patients can expect to undergo a two-to-four-month rehabilitation program, starting with light physical therapy supervised by a physical therapist (PT). A hip abduction brace may be used to prevent dislocation of the prosthesis.  Strengthening exercises are an essential part of healing and must be done daily so that you can return to normal activities as soon as possible. You may need help with walking, sitting, transferring, dressing, and other activities. If assistance is not available at home, you may be sent to a convalescent facility to recover.  

Specialists 

Hip Revision Specialists 

Benjamin Bengs, M.D., and Andrew Yun, M.D., provide consultation, diagnosis, and hip fracture treatment.  

Testimonials

Patient Testimonials

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